Tag Archives: new perspective

Screw positive thinking

I’ve been sitting on this link for some time out of sheer laziness.  But today I had a conversation with my coworkers that reminded me of it.

Lately I’ve found that no matter what I do it’s seemingly not good enough.  I’ve been trying and trying to achieve specific goals I set for myself, but to seemingly no avail.  Rereading this article shifts my thinking in a way that makes everything seem not as a huge fail, but a step in the right direction.

At the core, Rao is saying that we have been conditioned to think of certain things as bad and by labeling them as such we experience them in a negative way.  The key is to conditioning yourself to think of things quite simply as they are and finding ways through them instead of getting wrapped up in how awful a certain situation might be.

Case in point: I broke my foot while training for a ride I was really looking forward to and now I can’t participate.  This royally blows but now I get to work in the office full-time doing exactly what I want and loving every minute of it.  So instead of dwelling on the fact that I seem to break a foot every spring, I just see this for what it is: an opportunity.

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Totally new perspective

As I was driving to work this morning, I heard a really fascinating story on NPR, and it showed me just how shamefully unaware I was about the lives disabled people lead.  I think everyone I know is of the persuasion that if you have a disability why wouldn’t you search for a cure?  But Ben Mattlin argues that having a disability is just another form of diversity, something to be embraced as part of who you are. And that instead, our energies would be better spent on eliminating discrimination against disabilities (social, architectural, etc) than fighting for a cure.

I wish I could say that this was something that had occurred to me, but I always fell into the category of those striving for a cure. But now I see that Ben certainly has something to his argument and I can safely say that I experienced a paradigm shift this morning. Thanks NPR.